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Discover Johnson & Johnson in Brazil: a broader business platform in healthcare worldwide

Are you looking for opportunities to start or develop your career? Johnson & Johnson companies in Brazil provide a unique environment for building your career. One of our strengths is the comprehensive business platform in healthcare, with three distinct business segments, which can provide professional experiences and diverse career opportunities. Our family of companies includes:

  • The 6th largest consumer healthcare company in the world;
  • The largest and most diverse medical devices company in the world and diagnosis;
  • The 8th largest pharmaceutical company in the world.

In addition, we have a strong commitment to the development of our employees. These work daily to touch the lives of nearly a billion people around the world. At the same time, companies Johnson & Johnson in Brazil provide a culture of respect for employees as individuals, supporting the balance between personal and professional life.

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Johnson & Johnson companies in Brazil looking for professionals who have a daily commitment to improving the health and well being of people. If you have desire to make a difference and believes that it can contribute to the company's goal of being part of the lives of millions of people, come work with us.

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The trainee program Talents aims to identify and pursue potential of young, dynamic entrepreneurs, who like to relate to and work in teams.

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Guidant's woes make patients leery of ICDs: the device manufacturer has been at the center of controversy about disclosure of ICD ... An article from: Internal Medicine News
Book (International Medical News Group)
2008-10-15 17:42:47 by ozzie

Patents

Avoid patent brokers like the plague. Most just send out batches of ideas indiscriminately to companies who just drop the batches into wastebaskets. Month ago, the Costco Connection magazine has a letter to one of their advisors. He invested nearly ten grand, cannot even get return phone calls.
Less than 5% of ideas make it to production, and only 10% of those return a profit.
The prolific inventor Lamelson with 500 patents, spent half his life in court defending his patents and suing others for patent infringement.
NIH (Not Invented Here) is extremely strong

2012-02-28 19:20:02 by ozzie

And

Avoid patent brokers like the plague. Most just send out batches of ideas indiscriminately to companies who just drop the batches into wastebaskets. Some months ago, the Costco Connection magazine has a letter to one of their advisors. He invested nearly ten grand, cannot even get return phone calls.
Less than 5% of ideas make it to production, and only 10% of those return a profit. Another reference that I recent saw said only 1 in3000 products become a commercial success.
The prolific inventor Lamelson with 500 patents, spent half his life in court defending his patents and suing others for patent infringement

2010-01-22 21:05:57 by ozzie

Good advice from BostonPLawer above

Avoid patent brokers like the plague. Most just send out batches of ideas indiscriminately to companies who just drop the batches into wastebaskets. Some months ago, the Costco Connection magazine has a letter to one of their advisors. He invested nearly ten grand, cannot even get return phone calls.
Less than 5% of ideas make it to production, and only 10% of those return a profit.
The prolific inventor Lamelson with 500 patents, spent half his life in court defending his patents and suing others for patent infringement.
NIH (Not Invented Here) is extremely strong

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